Interview Tips

Best Interview Answers

When you’re interviewing with a company the best interview answers you can give to ANY question, is to make sure you answer any question as to “what it means to the company” and I don’t care what the question is… See, companies don’t really care about your personal issues or what you have been up to when they ask you opening questions. The only thing a company wants to know from you is, “What can you do for us?” or “What does that mean to our company” – that’s it! If they ask you about your time in the military, they want to know what your experience in the military means to their firm. If they ask you about your education and degree, they want to know what that education or degree means to their company. Get it! I really don’t care what the question is they are asking you, they only want to know, “What does that mean to us?” or “What can you do for us?” Period! If you want to have the best interview answers and “Ace” every interview try this technique, it works every time it’s tried! I hope this helps. Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo

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When Interviewing Be Enthusiastic!

I hear stories all the time about companies looking for “fresh blood” and a new way of thinking. All companies get stale or stagnant after a while. It happens to the best companies in the world. No company is immune to it. You have to be aware of this when you’re interviewing. Be energetic and enthusiastic when you’re interviewing. It matters. Even if you think the company isn’t going through this stale and stagnant period right now, they will still be looking for spark plugs, believe me. If you’re not the upbeat or energetic type, that’s fine but you need to be enthusiastic about your profession. You have to convey that you have new ideas and potentially new ways of doing things better and more productively. Not just a person that goes through the motions. Remember, they already have those on staff. As a professional recruiter I sit through meeting after meeting with clients and believe me they all want the same thing. I sit there and pretend to be interested, but they all say the same thing. They say, “We want some fresh blood and someone with new ideas” or some variation of that theme. Think about it? If you owned a company isn’t that what you would want? Absolutely! So the next time you’re interviewing keep in mind that companies have plenty of dead batteries throughout their company so what they really need are spark plugs! They will be looking at you to light it up! Be alive. Be enthusiastic about your profession. Be that fresh blood they’re looking for and need. If you seem like all of the other dead batteries throughout their company you won’t get the job! I hope this helps! Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo Creative Recruitment Strategies

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Do YOU Want To WIN Every Interview?

It’s true that every company is different in the way they do things, but there is one thing they all have in common and that is the need for talent. Top talent. People problems are their biggest problems. What can YOU do for the company? Can you solve the company’s people problems? Are you top talent? Are you a top performing employee or a high maintenance employee? If you can solve the company’s problem then you must make that point clear in the interview and stress what YOU can do for the company, early and often.

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Annoying Interview Questions!

Some interviewers can be very tricky and, quite frankly, very annoying with their interview questions. What’s the point? Just when I think I’ve heard and seen everything when it comes to interviewers and their crazy tactics, I’ll hear about something else that will drive me crazy. Maybe it’s just me, but I thought the purpose of an interview is to find out if someone is qualified for the position. Nope.

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How To Deal With Silly Interview Questions

Is there a way to deal with silly interview questions? Probably, but some of those silly questions are just designed to throw you off and see if you can think on your feet. I am not a big fan of what I call; The Games of Interviewing, but unfortunately some of the companies that you will be interviewing with are big fans. I tend to be more interested in the candidate and what they can do, not throw silly questions out to see how you respond, but that’s just me. So what is the purpose of these silly questions? What I have been told is it’s designed to see if the candidates can think on their feet when they’re asked a question that has absolutely nothing to do with the subject at hand. Confusing? Yes. Interesting? No. Can this tell you about a candidate? No. Let me give you some examples of what I am talking about. If you’re in the medical field interviewing for a medical position the interviewer might ask you, “Why do elephants have tusks?” or “When was the last time you went to the circus?” or my all time favorite, “Tell me a funny story about yourself” Yikes! The companies that do these types of interviews will tell you there really isn’t a wrong answer. Wrong! That’s what they say, but it’s not true! Believe me, they paid a lot of money for these tests and questionnaires and (according to them) there is a right way and wrong way to answer these silly questions. It is impossible to give you answers to every possible silly question you might receive in an interview, right? And the company just wants to see if you can think on your feet anyway, so how do you respond to odd questions? How fast can you come back with an answer? How do you deal with adversity? If you don’t know, what should you do? My recommendation is to practice with someone in your family. Have this family member ask you typical questions like, “Tell me about yourself?” or “What are your greatest strengths?” etc., then have this family member throw you some curve balls by throwing in some silly questions, but make sure they don’t tell you ahead of time what those silly questions will be. Practicing this will help you think on your feet. The games of interviewing will always be there because companies have been burned so many times with bad hires. Companies will try just about anything if they think it will help them find the perfect candidate. Don’t take this lightly! If you do not answer these silly questions the “right way” you will not get the position. So practice, practice, and practice! I hope this helps. Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo Concrete Recruiters

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Industry Lingo On Your Resume (CV)?

All industries have a certain “inside” language, so make sure you translate your resume so EVERYONE can understand it! In this space and on my radio show I have discussed this topic many times. Why do I keep bringing this up? Because we keep getting people sending us their resumes and we can’t understand what they do, that’s why. If we cannot understand what you do for a living how can we help you? Even if you have excellent experience in a specific industry you must translate it. Especially if you are changing careers! You military guys are the worst but engineers are a close second. When you are putting together your resume make sure it is understandable to people that are NOT in your industry. And this is key. Make sure you have someone other than your spouse read your resume. Do you know why? Most spouses understand your industry language. They live it. They breathe it. They understand it. Another thing, if you have made the decision to look outside of your current industry, make sure you don’t have a lot of specific industry abbreviations on your resume. Those can be confusing. Once again you military guys are the worst at this so make sure you translate all of your schools, duties, responsibilities, and positions you’ve held. A lot of your experience might be excellent, but if an HR Department of a corporation doesn’t understand it, what good is it? All industries have a certain insider’s language. If you are changing careers, whether it’s from construction to advertising or a military career to a civilian career, make sure you translate ALL of the information on your resume so EVERYONE can understand it! I hope this helps. Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo If you work in the heavy construction industries and need recruiting go to Heavy Construction Recruiters today!

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Sending Thank You Notes After Your Interviews?

Absolutely send a thank you note! A lot of people skip this step and it’s a mistake. The best way to do this is to hand write your thank you note on nice card stock. Make sure the note cards are professional. Keep it nice and simple. Don’t overkill it. Be sincere. Thank the person for taking the time to meet with you. With all of the email today, don’t you think it will make you stand out when you send a hand written thank you note? You bet! Don’t email it! If you need help with contracting recruiting in Massachusetts go to Massachusetts Construction Recruiters today! Another thing, if you don’t have the greatest handwriting get someone else to write it for you. I don’t want you to send a sloppy hand written note. I hope this helps. Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo If you need construction recruiting, specifically Industrial construction recruiting go to Industrial construction recruiters

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How To Deal With Bad References

Is a bad reference with a past employer keeping you from getting a job offer? It could be, depending on the situation, but there is a way to deal with a possible bad reference. Be honest! When you’re asked to supply references to a company give them at least three “good” references. Now here is where you want to make sure you speak to your references and explain to the individuals that they could get a call from someone at XYZ Company about a reference on you. Ask them what they would say about you. In my experience people like to be informed of such a call, they don’t like to be caught off guard. Make sure all of your references are on-board and okay with being a reference for you, before you supply them to a company. Once you’ve determined that this person will be a good reference then I would include them in your references. If a past employer has an issue with being a reference for you, then there could be a possible problem. I would just tell this person that it’s okay if they would rather not be a reference for you. Thank them for their time and move on to your next possible reference on your list. The key is you need to find references that will say something good about you. Okay, now let’s deal with that bad reference. For whatever reason, maybe a past employer and you didn’t see eye-to-eye, or you didn’t like working there, the people, location, hours, money, whatever, and you didn’t leave on the best of terms. DO NOT PUT THIS COMPANY DOWN AS A REFERENCE! It seems so obvious, doesn’t it? But you would be surprised how many references I have personally done and the company didn’t say anything good about the candidate. Can you believe this? It happens. Do not supply a bad reference to a company, got it? Where this can cause complications is when the company you’re trying to join asks for a specific reference from one of your past employers. And that particular employer is one you don’t want to include, for whatever reason. You can get this in smaller towns where everybody knows everybody. The company you’re trying to join might even pick-up the phone and call one of your past employers because they may know each other. This happens, again especially in smaller towns. If you didn’t include this particular company in your references they might ask you why. This is where you have to be honest about the situation and tell the truth. Make sure you stay positive about the situation. Say something like this “I didn’t put that company on my reference list because I didn’t leave on the best of terms. I really enjoyed working there it just wasn’t the right situation for me” I would stay as positive as possible. You can invite them to call that company, but tell them you have no idea what kind of […]

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Resume Building Tips

A lot of jobs listed on your resume? I have a great way to clean up your resume with some great resume building tips! As a professional recruiter, one of the things I do when I am evaluating a candidate’s resume is look at the length of stay or how often this candidate changes jobs. Sometimes at first glance it can look like a lot. Maybe it even looks like this candidate changes jobs every three years, or so. Not good. Not only our firm, but HR managers will look at your resume quickly (20 seconds?) and see if you fit what they are currently looking for and at first glance if it looks like you moved around a lot, you can be viewed as a “job jumper”. Most HR types, or recruiting firms, are not interested in filling a position with a candidate that will leave quickly, and then they will have to repeat the process of trying to fill this position again. If you get a reputation as a “job jumper” this will hurt your career greatly. The first thing you need to do to remedy this situation is to find a home for your career and stay there! Now, back to your resume. When you look at your resume does it look like you’ve had a lot of jobs? There are ways to fix these situations, not all, but some of the situations we see at our office. First, on your resume are there companies you’ve worked for more than once? Maybe you’ve worked for a company, changed jobs, and then went back to that same company? If you have anything like this, I want you to group these together and put the dates you’ve worked there, rather then list a bunch of companies and maybe three of the five companies on your resume are the same company. Group those same companies, or owners, together. Now maybe instead of a HR person, or recruiter, seeing five jobs at first glance they will see two, or three jobs. By grouping all of the same companies you’ve worked for together it will clean up your resume. Besides, it looks good on your resume when a company you used to work for hired you back, right? Secondly, when the economy went down hill did you take a couple of jobs to “hold you over”? Maybe you took something until you can find a position in your chosen field? Maybe even a temporary position? Maybe several in the last two years but you had a good record prior? If this is the case on your resume I want you to do the same thing, group all of these companies in one section with the dates you worked in these temporary positions. In other words, if you had two, three, maybe even four jobs to “hold you over” the last two years, I want you to have ONE section on your resume and list these temporary positions in that section. So, when […]

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Hiring Process After Interview

Do you want to know a great question to ask during the interview process? “What is your hiring procedure?” Always get a clear understanding of the company’s hiring procedure when you are interviewing. If you don’t know what their procedure is you might be wondering what the next step is, or why they aren’t getting back to you, etc. If you know their procedure it will help you with any anxiety you might be feeling. Also, when you know the company’s procedure you can plan accordingly. Get the details. You will want to know how many interviews? How long does it take? Where will the interviews take place? Who will be in the interviews? Is there any testing? And so on. What if you are currently working and they want to meet you during the day? And, if you can make it during the day, how long will the interview take? If this is the case you are going to have to plan accordingly. If your office is casual attire, will you have to go home and change into a suit? What if they want to meet you after hours? You will want to know where they want to meet. Is this a dinner meeting? What type of setting is it going to be? You get the idea. The most important reason to ask this question is – time! I want you to have a clear understanding about how long it takes the company to hire. This will save you a lot of aggravation. What if it takes several interviews, group interviews, flying to their corporate office, and anywhere between thirty to sixty days before they make their decision? Is this good information to know? Absolutely! If you’re not asking this question you are making a mistake. It will save you a lot of aggravation and anxiety if you know exactly what will take place and how long it will “typically” take. You won’t be worried if the company doesn’t get back to you right away, because you will know they have a slow hiring procedure. When I have a slow client I always tell the candidate, because I know they will want to hear something back right away, or at least know if they are still in-contention, or not, for the position. So, do yourself a favor, always ask for the companies hiring procedure when you are interviewing it will save you a lot of aggravation and anxiety. I hope this helps. Good luck to you! Mike Palumbo

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